AI-WHITEPAPER: Work, Qualification and Human-Machine Interaction

The Working Group 2 “Future of Work and Human-Machine Interaction” of the German Platform for Artificial Intelligence “Platform Learning Systems” recently published its Whitepaper.

The working group focuses on human-centred design of the future working world and on human-machine interaction issues (HMI). At the same time the working group serves as the interface between HMI and the area of Manufacturing and Industrie 4.0.

It’s an inspiring honour being member of this body of experts.

Download the Whitepaper here

AI-supported scenarios will be found in almost every industry in future. However, their degree of benefit varies greatly depending on the current state of technology, the scenario and the customer’s acceptance. In addition to valid B2B industry applications, AI-based chatbot solutions are for example currently reaching market maturity. A project using AI-technology must therefore take into account the respective use-case context and framework conditions.

Jochen Werne, Bankhaus August Lenz & Co. AG

About this Whitepaper

This paper was prepared by the Working Group Work/Qualification, Human-Machine Interaction of the Learning Systems Platform. As one of a total of seven working groups, it investigates the potentials and challenges arising from the use of artificial intelligence in the world of work and life. The focus is on questions of transformation and the development of humane working conditions. It also examines the requirements and options for qualification and lifelong learning, as well as starting points for shaping human-machine interaction and the division of labour between humans and technology.

The Working Group is lead by:

Prof. Dr. Elisabeth André, Universität Augsburg
Prof. Dr.-Ing. Prof. e. h. Wilhelm Bauer, Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO und Universität Stuttgart

Members of the Working Group are:

Prof. Dr. Lars Adolph, Bundesanstalt für Arbeitsschutz und Arbeitsmedizin (BAuA)Prof. Dr.-Ing. Jan C. Aurich, TU Kaiserslautern
Vanessa Barth, IG Metall
Klaus Bauer, TRUMPF Werkzeugmaschinen GmbH + Co. KGNadine Bender, KUKA Deutschland GmbH
Prof. Dr. Angelika Bullinger-Hoffmann, TU Chemnitz
Prof. Dr.-Ing. Barbara Deml, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)
Prof. Dr. Prof. h.c. Andreas Dengel, TU Kaiserslautern und
Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Künstliche Intelligenz (DFKI) GmbH
Dr. Jan-Henning Fabian, ABB AG
Prof. Dr.-Ing. Sami Haddadin, Munich School of Robotics and Machine Intelligence,
TU München
Prof. Dr. Michael Heister, Bundesinstitut für Berufsbildung (BIBB)
Dr. Norbert Huchler, Institut für Sozialwissenschaftliche Forschung e.V. (ISF-München)Dr. Nadine Müller, Vereinte Dienstleistungsgewerkschaft (ver.di)
Dr. Rahild Neuburger, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Prof. Dr.-Ing. Annika Raatz, Leibniz Universität Hannover
Prof. Dr.-Ing. Jürgen Roßmann, Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule AachenProf. Dr. Christoph M. Schmidt, RWI – Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung und Ruhr-Universität Bochum
Prof. Dr. Jochen Steil, TU Braunschweig
Andrea Stich, Infineon Technologies AG
Oliver Suchy, Deutscher Gewerkschaftsbund (DGB)
Prof. Dr.-Ing. Sascha Stowasser, Institut für angewandte Arbeitswissenschaft (ifaa)
Dr. Hans-Jörg Vögel, BMW Group
Dr. Bernd Welz, SAP SE
Jochen Werne, Bankhaus August Lenz & Co. AG

The Working Group is supported by:

Dr. Chi-Tai Dang, Universität Augsburg
Dr. Andreas Heindl, Geschäftsstelle der Plattform Lernende Systeme
Dr.-Ing. Matthias Peissner, Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAODr. Anke Soemer, Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der angewandten Forschung e.V.

Coined Liberty 2.0

Author: Jochen Werne

First published in German at LinkedIn Pulse on July 20, 2019. Please find article and sources in this link. Publication in English language pleas find below

On the role of cash in a modern society between technological progress and freedom

Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, one of the most important writers of the 19th century, impressively describes in his works the great existential and spiritual conflicts in which mankind was caught at the dawn of modernity. Not only his observations during the turbulent times of the upheaval of the Russian Empire in the 19th century, but also his personal experiences are an essential part of his work.

Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky

At the age of 28 and at the beginning of a promising career as a writer, Dostoevsky was sentenced to four years in a Siberian prison camp. The reason for this was his participation in meetings of the Petraschwezen, an intellectual circle that spoke out against tsarist despotism and serfdom. In his novel, “The House of the Dead”, which also describes Dostoyevsky’s own experiences in Siberian captivity, he formulates the sentence that was later much quoted: “Money is coined liberty”. The sentence describes the vital relevance of the possibility of a free exchange of goods in an unfree environment – and this through coined cash money.

More than 150 years have passed since the first publication of the work. Europe needed to go through the age of Enlightenment, the experiences of two world wars and a long cold war to become a peaceful and very liberal place for its citizens. A place which is putting the dignity and freedom of the individual first.

The freedom in our payment options has also multiplied thanks to technological progress. It is part of our everydays life to pay the morning croissant at the bakery, the new monthly ticket for the subway or even the use of public toilets – even without cash. Technological progress, the smartphone revolution and also our user behaviour made this evolution in payments possible. “Digital payments” have become part of our progressive society. However, the aspect of not having money physically tangible sometimes entails interesting and also unwanted aspects.

Society in upheaval

Like Dostoevsky, we also live in a time of extreme social, economic and political upheaval. An age in which exponential technology developments, industries and business models are changing radically and countries competing for dominance in areas such as artificial intelligence. It is a time when transformation is the new normality and an agile corporate culture is the key to success. In these times, for many it became clear that, “Everything that can be digitized will be digitized.” And thus the question inevitably arises whether this also applies to the first “Instant Payment” solution humans invented, one of the earliest and most sustainable achievements of civilization – cash.

Germans love affair with cash

If we look at Germany, cash is still one of the most popular payment methods and – culturally speaking – will probably remain for quite some time to come. According to a survey by the Bundesbank, 88 percent of German citizens continue to regard cash as their preferred means of payment. This cultural imprint can certainly also be traced back to modern history and the personal experiences of the Germans with their money. Beginning with the traumatic experience of hyperinflation during the Great Depression of 1923 and the resulting deep-rooted German understanding of the importance of a central bank independent from politics.

A painful experience, which states even today – like Venezuela – live through again and again and whose causes are often identical. In Reinhard and Rogoff’s bestseller book “This time is different”, this phenomenon is brilliantly explained using an analysis of 800 years of international economic history.

The positive image of (cash) money in Germany was impressively advanced after the end of the 2nd World War. From the currency reform of 1948 and the beginning of the economic miracle with 40 D-Mark, which every German was allowed to hold physically in his hands, to the 100 D-Mark welcome money at the reunification in 1989. These personal experiences paired with a consistently brillant independent work by the German Bundesbank – which always gave the population the feeling of having a strong, stable and secure own currency – are all German experiences, which were literally “obvious” and shaped the cultural reference of the country and its citizens.

The current freedom of our payment options is certainly good, as long as we consumers are free to decide which means of payment we pay with. Discussions about a possible restriction of citizens’ freedom of choice, for example through the abolition of cash, regularly call on intellectuals to take a warning position. The poet Hans Magnus Enzensberger, for example, has the following opinion on the subject of “restriction”: “Those who abolish cash abolish freedom”. Also former Deutsche Bundesbank board member Carl-Ludwig Thiele said at a conference in 2015: “Abolishing cash would hurt consumer sovereignty — the free choice of citizens about their payment instruments“ and “Government agencies do not have the right to tell citizens how they should pay.”

Having “physical power of disposal” over money, i.e. holding the banknote in one’s hands, immediately establishes a much stronger relationship for the value of something than a number on a display. More than ten years ago, the US scientists Raghubir and Srivastava in their essay for the “Journal if Experimental Psychology: Applied” described that the degree of abstraction often poses a problem when it comes to means of payment. They found a correlation between the indebtedness of individuals and the use of credit cards.

In Germany, the trend towards digital payment became apparent for the first time last year. In this period consumers in the stationary retail sector spent more money on checking and credit cards than in cash, as the trade research institute EHI recently announced.

Source: Deutsche Bundesbank

However, this does not mean that customers will soon only pay by card or smartphone, the experts emphasized at the same time. Three-quarters of all retail purchases continue to be settled in cash. When it comes to the highly sensitive issue of “money”, many consumers continue to find it difficult to trust the comprehensive healing promises of an omnipresent digital world.

In order to ensure that cash and book money continue to be equally available, the players involved in the cash cycle, such as CIT companies like Prosegur, ATM operators like IC-Cash, banks like Bankhaus August Lenz et al., are working concentrated to make the provision of cash at all locations even more efficient and cost-effective. Both the providers of cash solutions and those of digital solutions experiment therefore with the latest blockchain and AI technologies to reach the before mentioned goals.

Technological vulnerability and fall-back option

Especially in extreme scenarios, such as catastrophes or other failures of a digital infrastructure due to cyberattacks, natural events or simply technical failure, it becomes clear how cash – by its very nature – proves to be actually the most robust payment method. Ultimately, it is not tied to electricity, digital infrastructures, passwords or other technical features – it is simply available. An interesting recent anecdote occurred in Sweden, which is one of the most advanced countries in cashless payment. A country where even the traditional church collection is now equipped with a card reader. At the Bråvalla music festival 2014, for example, the memory chips on the admission tickets went on strike. Thousands of thirsty fans sat on dry land and had to write out promissory notes for their drinks by hand. An experience that can be observed again and again when paying at the checkout, when the magnetic stripe of a card or simply the card reader does not work and the views of the people standing around in the queue are impatiently looking at the payer and trying to catch a glimpse of the name on the card of the supposedly non-solvent unlucky fellow.

Data Protection Best Practice

In an interview with Rheinische Post in February 2017, Klaus Müller, head of the Federal Association of Consumer Groups (Bundesverband der Verbraucherzentralen), said “Cash is data protection in practice”. He added: “Unbarred figures leave traces of data that can be used commercially to create a consumer profile. This data may be illegally “fished” by third parties.” Now Müller points to nothing new here and opponents of cash, use the argumentation to underline that the supposed anonymity of cash can be used for illegal business and transactions and that the suppression of cash stands above the protection of privacy. But since the first publication of the interview, the introduction of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), the recently imposed $5 billion fine against Facebook for the Cambridge Analytica scandal and similar events, the sensitivity of the European population with regard to data protection and privacy has grown substantially.


Financial privacy


In the closing sentence of his speech at the Cash Symposium 2018 of the Deutsche Bundesbank, the former judge of the German Federal Constitutional Court, Prof. Dr. Udo Di Fabio, underlined the probably most important point in the current discussion about cash. He said that in principle it is “not to be underestimated” that every citizen has the souvereignity of the free disposal of his money – of his personal “exchangeable assets”. He further added that this is particularly true when “financial privacy” is considered legally imperative. In other words, a society whose entire assets would be managed in digital form only, could also exercise only limited individual control over its money and would have to ask itself, “whether the state would be entitled via its central bank to carry out a controlled devaluation through negative interest rates, accounting discounts or fees on credit balances”. Prof. Di Fabio further points out that this would then not only be a property encroachment, but as a result possibly also the imposition of a special levy, which is permitted in the German legal system only under narrow conditions.

For young Fjodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky the conversion to book money in the Siberian prison would have meant the withdrawal of his individual sovereignity over money, so that he would not have had any more the fortune of using cash for the exchange of goods and other things. He describes the quintessence of this situation as follows: The suffering of prisoners who don’t have money is 10 times greater.

Thus, it is reasonable to assume that the intellectual serious discussions about cash and civil liberty rights would delight Dostoyevsky, with his experiences in an unfree society.


Our open and liberal society is characterised by the fact that we have and continue the discussion about “Coined Liberty 2.0” at this level.

Event: The Future of Banking – Diplomatic Council Breakfast Talk with Jochen Werne

THE EVENT

The speaker this morning is Jochen Werne, a graduate banking and marketing specialist. As director and authorized signatory, he is responsible for private banking and corporate banking at Bankhaus August Lenz & Co. AG in Munich.  He is guest lecturer at universities and colleges, keynote speaker at banking and innovation conferences, author and co-author of books and articles on leadership, innovation, KI, FinTechs, Cyber Security and much more. He is a member of the platform for artificial intelligence “Learning Systems” initiated by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research and advising the German Federal Government as well as of the Royal Institute of International Affairs Chatham House, ambassador of the Peter Tamm sen. foundation and is listed by Focus-Magazin as one of the AI experts in Germany. He is the founder of the Global Offshore Sailing Team GOST and co-founder of the NGO Mission4Peace, which is dedicated to historical research, building international diplomatic relations and promoting international dialogue.

The participants will also get to know the Diplomatic Council (DC) this morning. It combines a global think tank, a business network and a charity foundation in a unique organization with consultative status at the United Nations. Stephanie Stoerk, Chapter Director DC Stuttgart, explains what distinguishes the Diplomatic Council from all other networks and what advantages it offers its members.

Breakfast is open from 8:30 am. At 9:00 a.m. we start our official program (whoever comes earlier has time to eat in peace), which lasts until 10:30 a.m. (including questions and answers). In between there is always the possibility to eat from the rich breakfast buffet.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator

PROGRAMM

Der Redner an diesem Morgen ist der diplomierte Banking- und Marketing-Spezialist Jochen Werne. Er verantwortet als Direktor und Prokurist das Private Banking sowie den Corporate Banking Bereich bei der Bankhaus August Lenz & Co. AG in München.  Er ist Gastdozent an Universitäten und Hochschulen, Keynote Speaker auf Banking- und Innovationskonferenzen, sowie Autor und Co-Autor von Büchern und Artikeln zu Leadership, Innovation, KI, FinTechs, Cyber Security u. v. m. Er ist u. a. Mitglied der vom Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung initiierten und die deutsche Bundesregierung beratende Plattform für Künstliche Intelligenz „Lernende Systeme“ sowie des Royal Institute of International Affairs Chatham House, Botschafter der Peter Tamm sen. Stiftung und wird vom Focus-Magazin als einer der KI-Experten in Deutschland geführt. Er ist Gründer des Global Offshore Sailing Teams GOST und Co-Founder der NGO Mission4Peace, die sich der historischen Forschung, dem Aufbau internationaler, diplomatischer Beziehungen sowie der Förderung eines internationalen Dialogs widmet.

Darüber hinaus lernen die Teilnehmer an diesem Morgen das Diplomatic Council (DC) kennen. Es verknüpft einen globalen Think Tank, ein Business Network und eine Charity Foundation in einer einzigartigen Organisation mit Beraterstatus bei den Vereinten Nationen. Stephanie Stoerk, Chapter Director DC Stuttgart, informiert, was das Diplomatic Council von allen anderen Netzwerken unterscheidet und welche Vorteile sich daraus für die Mitglieder ergeben.

Das Frühstück ist ab 8:30 Uhr geöffnet. Um 9:00 Uhr starten wir unser offizielles Programm (wer früher kommt, hat also Zeit, in Ruhe zu essen), das bis 10:30 Uhr andauert (inklusive Fragen und Antworten). Es besteht zwischendurch jederzeit die Möglichkeit, sich vom reichhaltigen Frühstücksbuffet zu versorgen

Video: Full ec4u digital thoughts Conference Keynote: What’s next? Expeditions into the digital realm

Jochen Werne, Director Marketing & Business Development at Bankhaus August Lenz, explains in his keynote address how we can shape the future from the innovations and topics of the past and why digitization must be thought of not only technologically but also culturally.

ec4u Digital Thoughts Conference Keynote

Jochen Werne, Direktor Marketing & Business Development beim Bankhaus August Lenz, erläutert in seiner Keynote, wie wir aus den Innovationen und Themen der Vergangenheit in der Gegenwart die Zukunft gestalten können und warum Digitalisierung nicht nur technologisch, sondern auch kulturell gedacht werden muss.

Keynote announcement: International Banking Innovation Forum, Vienna

Banking Professionals are faced with many new challenges as PSD2 & Instant Payments in Europe at center stage which are driving automation and Innovations. It will be a great pleasure representing Bankhaus August Lenz with a keynote on the importance of the combination of all aspects of HUMAN, DIGITAL & CULTURE to create valuable business models for future banking. Looking forward joining other Top Industry Experts to tackle these topics with them.

German Stevies committee is awarding innovations and human creativity

The German Stevie Awards are a top-class business award for the German business world. Outstanding achievements are rewarded in over 80 different categories: from Manager of the Year in over 30 industries, to Marketing Campaign of the Year, to Product of the Year, and more.

It’s greatly inspiring seeing the different approaches companies are going to be innovative and a step ahead of their competition in a highly dynamic business environment

Jochen Werne
German Stevie Awards Jury Member
Management & Human Ressources


Jury member Jochen Werne about the importance of the human factor in a digital world

Academy for Leadership: Adventure with plan

Article published in the Advance Magazine 01/2018 

https://advance-online.de/zeitungen/advance-01-18/story/

Translated by DeepL

 

2012 Expedition “Cerberus”, day 3.

A workplace to fear.  The wind whips the sailing yacht of the Global Offshore Sailing Team through the English Channel.  The heating goes on strike, everything on board is clammy and ice-cold.  Five men take turns on watch, the maximum rest period is three hours.  Götz Gredé had been forewarned, had packed heaps of warm things and his father’s lined hunting boots.  When he needs them, the rubber crumbles in his fingers.  They were probably too old and simply dried up, the good pieces.  For the guard on deck, Götz now has to slip into thin sneakers.  He freezes like never before in his life, thinking only of escape.  “In the next harbour I leave the ship.  You don’t mind, do you?” he asks Jochen Werne.  “Yes,” the expedition leader replies.  Götz is speechless. Then he learns something for life.

1991: Gorch Fock.

Give up or hold out?  Jochen Werne never asked himself this question.  The wiry mid-forty grows with his tasks, that’s always been the case.  He grew up in a village near Waldshut, directly on the Swiss border.  At the station kiosk, where others stock up on grain, he buys the “Herald Tribune”.  The view over the edge of the plate awakens the wanderlust.  He is particularly fascinated by seafaring.  He reports to the navy.  There he belongs to the best, can choose his command.  And he chooses one of the hardest jobs there is: the sail training ship “Gorch Fock”.  89 metres long, dream ship on the outside, life reduced to a minimum on the inside: 30 men on 30 square metres.  Privacy only exists on the mast at a height of 40 metres.  Werne has to sleep in the 1.75 metre long bunk.  Werne measures 1.79 metres.  “Turning around is not possible,” he says.  “I never lay in a coffin, but I didn’t have much more room.”  So it goes twice around the world.

What the navigator likes: sailing, camaraderie.  What’s not: the bureaucracy and the inertia of the system.  After two years duty on the “Gorch Fock” he decides against the officer career and studies business administration.  Even today, Werne criticizes rigid, inefficient structures that do not fit into an ever faster society: “The bigger the company, the easier it is for me to hide behind bureaucratic processes.  Do it on a ship!”

It turns out that shipping not only demands good leadership, it also provides strategic approaches when it comes to coping with disruption.  “The Apollo 11 space capsule had 12,300 transistors, 3 billion fit on the processor of the Apple iPad Air 2.”  Werne is enthusiastic about the exponential growth of digital technologies.  “We live in the most prosperous time ever,” he says.  His confidence has little to do with his belief in technology; it is based on a deeper insight: “We are all biased.  Fears from childhood block our view of the positive.”

2017 London, Chatham House.

Take digitization, for example: “Of course many jobs will be lost,” says Werne, “but many will also be created.  Nobody knows yet how big the gap between them will be.  Is digitalization the biggest upheaval in human history?  “That’s only what 30-year-olds say,” says Werne and laughs.  It’s not a matter of worrying.  After all, people are still the driving force behind technology.  That also gives them the freedom to make their own decisions.  For example, about what happens to that part of the population whose jobs are disappearing.  Do we need a basic income?  “Perhaps.  But above all we need a plan,” says Werne.

Such plans are being discussed at Chatham House, for example, one of the world’s most important think tanks based in London.  Jochen Werne discusses security, politics and society with the other members there.  He also talks about the future of work: “We need contingency plans, otherwise high unemployment threatens and people lose their prospects,” he says.  Above all, however, fear must be combated.  It is important to illustrate the benefits of new technologies for people.  Werne uses YouTube videos, for example, which show how Parkinson’s patients learn to control their trembling with the help of an implanted chip.  Or a development of the world’s largest wine producer. At Gallo in California, all vines were equipped with sensors.  They measure the moisture in the soil.  This data is enriched with weather data from NASA satellites.  “On this basis, Gallo was able to save 25 percent water during irrigation from one day to the next,” says Werne.

I FIRMLY BELIEVE IN MANKIND AND MORE IN ITS CREATIVE POWER THAN IN ITS DESTRUCTIVE POWER.

2003 Munich, Bankhaus August Lenz.

To see the future as a great adventure, this view of the world also brings momentum into professional life.  After studying business administration, Jochen Werne worked at an Internet start-up, then became an analyst at Bankers Trust Alex.  Brown International and in Global Investment Banking at Deutsche Bank.  In 2001, he joined Accenture as a CRM specialist.  His latest client there is the Mediolanum Group, an Italian financial services provider.  In 2001 it took over the Munich bank August Lenz.  Werne has been working for the “most personal private bank” since 2003, according to the promise in the slogan. As Director of Marketing, Business Development, Treasury & Payment Services, he drives the bank’s digitization.  He also deliberately seeks cooperation with up-and-coming Fintechs and develops services for which the bank has already received several awards.  “Innovation must start with top management,” he says.  His strategy: “Bring the right people together, then make it easy.  Werne borrows a nice term for this from Erich Fromm: “spontaneous activity”. “Spontane is important, it brings in creativity,” he says.  The concept “9 to 5” is dead, in new working environments it is exactly about making it as easy as possible for employees to come up with ideas.  Hierarchies are indispensable, says Werne.  Not only when sailing.  But he does restrict: “If the hierarchy stands, you also have to delegate and trust.  I’ve never seen anyone fail to accept a task assigned to them.”

2012 Expedition “Cerberus”, day 3.

Which brings us back to the freezing Götz Credé.  “He was completely perplexed because I didn’t want to just let him leave the boat,” recalls Werne.  In the conversation he draws a clear line: “We are in an uncomfortable situation, not in a struggle for survival.  Then he outlines a possible future for his colleague: “If you give up, you’ll always find plenty of reasons to justify yourself.  People will agree with you.  But that’s not the point.  It’s about admitting to yourself: “I can’t do that.”  When the next similar situation comes, you will behave like that again.  And in the end you walk stooped through life.”  Götz Credé stays and is the first one to sign up for the next tour.  Jochen Werne says: “The strongest drive comes from within.  Life is always about answering three questions: “What do I want?”, “What does it cost me?” and “Am I willing to pay the price?

Werne recommends all those who don’t feel comfortable at work to answer these questions for themselves.  He focuses on personality and freedom in the search for talent: “You can no longer reach the target group with the classic job description,” he says.  It is more important to appear authentic and to enable employees to shape their own work.  Only in this way can a company be successfully managed, because: “The well-being and woe always depends on the people”.

AS SOON AS THE HIERARCHY IS SET, ONE MUST ALSO BE ABLE TO DELEGATE AND TRUST.

2017 Prologue.

Jochen Werne likes to digress when he talks.  Always in an honest effort to leave the visitor in the dark about nothing.  The world is complicated.  Jochen Werne thinks deeper than many others.  The visitor experiences a doer with brains, an adventurer with a plan.  Oh what, with many plans.  Sovereign in appearance, blessed with the ability to get enthusiastic about one thing and carry others along.  The most beautiful example: In 1999 Jochen Werne founded the international Global Offshore Sailing Team (gost.org) to combine two passions: sailing on the high seas and international understanding.  30 to 40 members from different nations belong to the crew in changing line-ups.  “There are no national differences at sea, especially in extreme situations,” says Werne.  And these are the result in the following years, from the fight against storm and ice in Spitsbergen to the machine breakdown in the English Channel. The machine is repaired by the expedition leader himself, although he actually has no idea about the matter.  He thinks, analyses, finally finds the blocked cooling circuit and cleans it.  There was simply no one else there who could have done it better.  The banker, future thinker and expedition leader Jochen Werne trusts himself quite naturally.  In the end, we have the impression that with self-confidence, experience and a thirst for adventure, the future can not only be mastered, but well shaped.

Antarctica 2018: “Mankind can do a lot!

One of the expeditions led by Jochen Werne led to the Arctic ice in 2016.  The GOST team sailed to the pack ice border in the footsteps of researchers like Roald Amundsen, Fridtjof Nansen and Ernest Shackleton.  It commemorated the seamen who fought in the battles for Arctic convoys with supplies for Russia in the Second World War between 1941 and 1943.  In the name of Norway and Canada, the expedition participants handed over wreaths of the sea in memory of the fallen.  At the same time, the expedition was to raise awareness of the effects of climate change on the Arctic.  The expedition team was supported by King Harald of Norway, the Canadian government and Chancellor Angela Merkel.

In February 2018, Jochen Werne set course for Antarctica.  “This is a completely different story again,” he says.  The average temperature on the coldest continent is minus 30 degrees, and the ice layer is on average 2.1 kilometres thick.  The “Antarctic Blanc” expedition primarily serves the environment.  The “Antarctic Treaty” has been in force since 1961, an agreement between 30 countries that have committed themselves to refrain from using Antarctica for military purposes and to exchange their research results openly.  In 1998, the “Environmental Protocol” was also signed, which is considered the toughest environmental protection agreement in the world.  Werne is optimistic: “It shows that we as humanity can achieve a lot, regardless of what opinions we hold.

The importance that the GOST expeditions now enjoy was already apparent in advance.  Support came from the Queen of England, the Vienna Hofburg and the office of the German Federal President.  The heads of state of the Czech Republic and Finland sent personal letters, Belgium, Bulgaria, Sweden and Switzerland were also on board.  Jochen Werne manages this with months of dedication and the motto: “If you want to achieve something – always start at the top”.

The expeditions on the web:

Global Offshore Sailing Team: www.gost.org

Arctic Expedition 2016: www.arcticoceanraptor.com

Antarctic Expedition 2018: www.antarcticblanc.com

Bankhaus August Lenz: www.banklenz.de

Messekongress Kundenmanagement in Versicherungen

Speaker Engagement
 
“Es is ein besonderes Vergnügen zur Premiere des Messekongresses Kundenmanagement in Versicherungen, mit dem Expertenauditorium über die Zukunft des Versicherungssektors und ‘KundenBEZIEHUNGEN in Zeiten exponentieller Technologie’ zu reflektieren. Gratulation an das Team der Versicherungsforen Leipzig zur Schaffung dieses neuen Konferenzformats”
 
Jochen Werne, Direktor & Prokurist der Bankhaus August Lenz & Co. AG
 
 
 
Impulsgeber page2image3791479472
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2019 öffnet der Messekongress Kundenmanagement in Versicherungen erstmals seine Tore für Sie und Kollegen aus der Versicherungswirtschaft. Dabei fügen sich erfolgreiche Veranstaltungskonzepte der Versicherungsforen Leipzig, zu den The- men Vertriebsmanagement, Beschwerdemanagement, Social Media und Kunden- management, ineinander und formen diese neue Plattform für die Assekuranz.

Als IMPULSGEBER vereint der Messekongress die innovativsten Ideen und Lösun- gen und garantiert Ihnen an zwei Tagen strukturierten Erfahrungsaustausch und maximalen Wissenstransfer zu allen Themen rund um das ganzheitliche Kunden- management. Nutzen Sie das spannende Vortragsprogramm, die vielschichtige Ausstellung und interaktive Formate, um die Themenfelder Kundenmanagement, Beschwerde- und Qualitätsmanagement, Vertriebsmanagement sowie Social Me- dia mit Kollegen aus der Branche zu diskutieren. Wir freuen uns auf Sie!

Book recommendation– Innovations and innovation management in the financial sector

Transformation of an analogue private bank into an innovation driver

Co-Author: Jochen Werne

Chapter: Transformation of an analogue private bank into an innovation driver

Find a reading extract here

Buy at Amazon / Springer Shop / Thalia / Hugendubel / GooglePlay

published by Springer

Content extract

Chapter 5: Transformation of an analogue private bank into an innovation driver
Reflection on change, technological progress and human behaviour in disruptive times
The article analyses and discusses the changes, challenges, decision paths and implementation practices of Bankhaus August Lenz in the years 2014 to 2016. In addition, the author would like to provide executives and managers entrusted with the transformation of their institution with practical arguments that may help them to cope better with daily challenges in change management practice. As a traditional private bank with a European parent, the task was not only to complete the transition away from a fully analog bank, but also to adapt the Group’s strategy for the German market with the budget adapted to the size of the institution. The most important internal customer was also integrated into the change: the Family Banker®, which is at the heart of the philosophy and is responsible for customer contact. This human contact and personal contact is the guarantee for the indispensable relationship of trust between customer and bank. The author examines issues such as coopetition, agile project management approaches and cooperation with FinTechs. In addition, topics such as value proposition, behavioral finance, the need to concentrate on core issues, the importance of personal consulting in the digital age and exchange in an international working environment as well as communication are treated as essential success factors. The paper does not claim to be perceived as a scientific work, but focuses on the practical implementation of the core problem of a market participant in a disruptive market – the question of how to restructure and realign companies in order to continue to play a role as a market player in the future.